Let me set the scene for you–an unpleasant Monday morning sales meeting is centered around a discussion of lack of sales, and you ask for everyone’s input, which goes something like this:

“It’s the marketing team’s fault. I’m just a salesperson.”

“It’s the marketing team’s fault. I’m just a manager.”

“It’s the marketing team’s fault. I’m just an employee.”

Round and round we go, because It’s much easier to point fingers. Why would anyone want to look in the mirror?

It becomes easier to place accountability when you start abiding by the philosophy that everyone in your company is an extension of your marketing team.

Let me repeat that: Everyone in your company is on your marketing team.

What do I mean by this? It means that every interaction a consumer has with your brand, whether it’s messaging online, visiting your brick and mortar store, or speaking with a member of your team, is a marketing opportunity.

You may disagree, because many feel marketing are those folks in the back of the office, or the agency we hire, or just some catchy phrase we came up with.

Yes, there are people internally or externally that execute marketing efforts. They place ads, create videos and commercials–but it does not stop there.

Every phone call is marketing. How you answer is marketing, and ensuring that you are attentive, pleasant and there for the consumer is just as big a part of your most recent campaign as the folks in the back of the office creating the strategies are.

Every email response you send out is marketing, whether you are there helping to answer a question, solve a problem, or fulfill an order.

On site, the way you greet (or don’t greet) a consumer is marketing.

Every visual, down to the tiny details like how your desk looks, reinforces your marketing messaging.

In short, every single thing you and your employees do is marketing.

Take a moment and pick one area of where your team interacts with consumers.

Look at their word tracks, call scripts or emails. Are you marketing to them?

In automotive, a person sends in an inquiry on a vehicle. Usually, the first email or two are really good at focusing on the vehicle price, options, availability and sharing the company’s value proposition.

The next day, in some cases, a manager will send out an email or call sharing who they are, asking if the customer needs anything, and sharing their contact information.

They are setting a good example of marketing to the customer that everyone is on board to make their shopping experience fantastic.

As we approach day three, this is where the disconnect between your marketing and your practice begins to show. Salespeople tend to focus only on the vehicle. “Did you get my quote I sent you?” “When would you like to come in?” “Do you have any questions on the vehicle?”

What if we re-purpose all interactions after day 2 to continue to market the value of the dealership to them instead of just focusing on one thing? Marketing is what got their interest in the first place.

The customer could buy a car anywhere, but your marketing messages on value, pricing, and experience got their attention and gave you a chance to interact. With this in mind, everyone needs to be thinking of their interactions in person, phone, or email at every touchpoint as marketing.

Take the time to go through every step, no matter how small.

Wherever you fit in an interaction path, take a moment and look around. If you are in the dealership, take a walk around the parking lot to see what customers will see when they first get out of the car.

Look at the clutter on people’s desks where customers sit. Watch how employees are dressed or interact with each other in front of customers when they don’t think people are watching.

Don’t forget to read your customer reviews and testimonials. Those will help you to see where you may need to reinforce your real value to customers.

If you want to continue to grow your business, remember that everyone is part of your marketing team. Their actions reinforce what you are promising in the marketplace.

If you have any questions or thoughts, just reach out. I’d be more than happy to lend a hand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glenn Pasch

Glenn Pasch is a Partner and CEO of PCG Digital. Glenn continues to author articles for multiple industry publications, blogs and forums as well as continuing his writing online at www.glennpasch.com.