Winning, or achieving the results you desire can feel fantastic. All of your efforts have paid off and your execution was successful. As the leader of your team, you feel a sense of pride. Once the high-fives are done and the celebration is over, the real key is what happens next. 

Do you as a leader review your success with as much vigor as you do when results are not achieved? For many the answer is no. But that can be a major deprecation to your success. 

Let’s describe a typical meeting when the team was successful. Phrases like:
 
“You all worked hard this month”
“You killed it”
“Let’s do it again.”
 
 Some variation of support, encouragement, or motivation was expressed, but all in a general sense.
Now let’s look at a meeting where results were not met. Phrases like:
 
“You did not make enough calls”
“Your closing percentage is low. What happened to the customer you were working with?”
“I will be looking into what you have been doing and having conversations with each of you one-on-one.”
 
Can you spot a difference in the way these messages were delivered? When the team was unsuccessful, the team leader focused on what specific actions weren’t taken, and what goals weren’t achieved because of it. In order to see continued success, the team’s actions should be pointed out with precision when the team is winning. Actions cause results. If the results are not happening, focusing on the actions allow the leader to train in a more targeted manner. 
 
Success was accomplished through a series of actions. It is counterproductive to only point out specific actions to your team when they were unsuccessful. But this poses the question- does your team know specifically what they did that was so successful when they won?Can they repeat their efforts? Or is assuming they already know a slippery slope to complacency, which ultimately leads to declining performance. 
 

Great leaders spend time reinforcing actions that lead to success. They don’t take it for granted. Their belief in repetition to anchor in behavior is key to their success

Pushback from certain leaders could be in the form of feeling their team is composed of adults. That repetition is in some way condescending or offensive. Yet professional athletes run their plays over and over with the eyes of their coaches on them daily. 

Repetition: Friend or Foe?

Think of any championship team that consistently is in the playoffs or winning championships. There is a consistency of practice, inspection and coaching to deliver consistent results. Just because times are good or winning is happening does not mean it will remain.

Currently in the automotive industry, dealers are seeing record profits due to inventory shortages. The fish are jumping in the boat” as someone in the industry recently said. 

If this is the case, could processes become sloppy because winning is easier right now? Could salespeople be lacking full effort with every customer because if this customer does not want it, the next one will? Is leadership lacking in their inspection of processes because the numbers currently look good?

The results generated by complacency are not often seen right away. Slight losses can be blamed on external factors other than internal efforts of the team. Leadership hopes for a bounce back until a few months later the decline is picking up speed. 

Just as a team could put together a magical season once, only to fall back into mediocrity, so can businesses. This is a magical time right now for dealerships, but no one knows how long the season of success will last. The question needs to be addressed regarding processes and effort. 

Are you anchoring in the right effort or anchoring in sloppy behavior? Behavior cannot be flipped on like a light switch. It takes time and effort to change and to retain the right actions for success. Reinforcement of behaviors that lead to success is key to your business and its continued victory.

 

Don’t be blinded by the quick wins, the bright lights, and the pats on the back. Dynasties are built through consistency on the right actions. Repetition should not be viewed negatively, as it is the key to delivering excellence in experience for customers, which will lead to repetitive buying and loyalty because customers will know what to expect each time they interact with your business.

Actions cause results. Repetition is the anchor. Inspect winning with the same passion and precision as losing.

Glenn Pasch is the CEO of PCG Digital, a full-service digital agency for automotive dealers. He is also the host of the popular, “You’re in Charge: Conversations that Spark Change” podcast. He is the author of three books and an international keynote speaker. Contact him at glenn@pcgcompanies.com

Glenn Pasch
Glenn Pasch
Glenn Pasch is a Partner and CEO of PCG Digital. Glenn continues to author articles for multiple industry publications, blogs and forums as well as continuing his writing online at www.glennpasch.com.
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